girlonfic replied to your post “Just watching TSoT again…”

STILL can’t watch the very end, though. I’m okay up until he’s looking for Janine and she’s otherwise occupied. But then… no. But the rest of it? OH yeah. I like S3 more and more with time. :)

I even like the painful end. I mean, I hate to see him suffer because I love him so, so much, but I think that as a character, he needs a crucible and I love to watch how he is transformed. I know he’ll be all right.

As an aside, I keep thinking of the bit in ASiP when Mycroft says of John, “He could be the making of my brother…” because, when my British husband and I got engaged, one of his family friends said to his mother “She’ll be the making of him.” And, now we’ve been married for several years, the same woman told me recently, at my husband’s brother’s wedding “Mr. UFG is doing so well. You’ve been the making of him.” Then, someone told me the same day that my husband’s brother’s wife would be the making of him. I’ve really heard that phrase so many times while amongst my British family and friends and ONLY in association with marriage or relationships. 

I want Sherlock to get the love he so richly deserves, and I hate to see him sad and bereft, but I think his unselfish love has been and will be the making of him — will finally show him to be the good man he truly is, but he needs to suffer and be denied and walk through his own valley of shadow and love steadfastly through it all to get there. I am enjoying the journey, even when it’s painful.

I have always loved season three, and the more I think about it and revisit it, the more I love it. I read so much criticism of it, and so many posts where its inferiority is the a priori assumption that underlies everything else in the comment, and I just think… this is a person who has always seemed clever and insightful to me, and yet, I feel so differently! Is my love for season 3 of Sherlock a sign that I am dumb or perhaps just egregiously sentimental? Is it a sign of my appalling taste? Because, I really, really don’t get all the angst about it. It just seems so lovely, so rich, and so romantic to me. It hits me right in the proverbial feels in the most delicious way. I adore it.

Season 3 love, here. Seriously.

asylum-art:

RealisticTiny Embroidered Animals by  Chloe Giordano
Artist Tumblr
Chloe Giordano is a self-described “illustrator, avid reader, history lover and dreadful knitter” from Buckinghamshire, England. She may not be a great knitter, but her embroidery is more than up to par. Shown here are her tiny embroidered animals, done freehand. Giordano’s mixture of multiple colored threads adds detail and dimension

Oh god.  I love these so much I could die.
Zoom Info
asylum-art:

RealisticTiny Embroidered Animals by  Chloe Giordano
Artist Tumblr
Chloe Giordano is a self-described “illustrator, avid reader, history lover and dreadful knitter” from Buckinghamshire, England. She may not be a great knitter, but her embroidery is more than up to par. Shown here are her tiny embroidered animals, done freehand. Giordano’s mixture of multiple colored threads adds detail and dimension

Oh god.  I love these so much I could die.
Zoom Info
asylum-art:

RealisticTiny Embroidered Animals by  Chloe Giordano
Artist Tumblr
Chloe Giordano is a self-described “illustrator, avid reader, history lover and dreadful knitter” from Buckinghamshire, England. She may not be a great knitter, but her embroidery is more than up to par. Shown here are her tiny embroidered animals, done freehand. Giordano’s mixture of multiple colored threads adds detail and dimension

Oh god.  I love these so much I could die.
Zoom Info
asylum-art:

RealisticTiny Embroidered Animals by  Chloe Giordano
Artist Tumblr
Chloe Giordano is a self-described “illustrator, avid reader, history lover and dreadful knitter” from Buckinghamshire, England. She may not be a great knitter, but her embroidery is more than up to par. Shown here are her tiny embroidered animals, done freehand. Giordano’s mixture of multiple colored threads adds detail and dimension

Oh god.  I love these so much I could die.
Zoom Info
asylum-art:

RealisticTiny Embroidered Animals by  Chloe Giordano
Artist Tumblr
Chloe Giordano is a self-described “illustrator, avid reader, history lover and dreadful knitter” from Buckinghamshire, England. She may not be a great knitter, but her embroidery is more than up to par. Shown here are her tiny embroidered animals, done freehand. Giordano’s mixture of multiple colored threads adds detail and dimension

Oh god.  I love these so much I could die.
Zoom Info
asylum-art:

RealisticTiny Embroidered Animals by  Chloe Giordano
Artist Tumblr
Chloe Giordano is a self-described “illustrator, avid reader, history lover and dreadful knitter” from Buckinghamshire, England. She may not be a great knitter, but her embroidery is more than up to par. Shown here are her tiny embroidered animals, done freehand. Giordano’s mixture of multiple colored threads adds detail and dimension

Oh god.  I love these so much I could die.
Zoom Info
asylum-art:

RealisticTiny Embroidered Animals by  Chloe Giordano
Artist Tumblr
Chloe Giordano is a self-described “illustrator, avid reader, history lover and dreadful knitter” from Buckinghamshire, England. She may not be a great knitter, but her embroidery is more than up to par. Shown here are her tiny embroidered animals, done freehand. Giordano’s mixture of multiple colored threads adds detail and dimension

Oh god.  I love these so much I could die.
Zoom Info
asylum-art:

RealisticTiny Embroidered Animals by  Chloe Giordano
Artist Tumblr
Chloe Giordano is a self-described “illustrator, avid reader, history lover and dreadful knitter” from Buckinghamshire, England. She may not be a great knitter, but her embroidery is more than up to par. Shown here are her tiny embroidered animals, done freehand. Giordano’s mixture of multiple colored threads adds detail and dimension

Oh god.  I love these so much I could die.
Zoom Info

asylum-art:

RealisticTiny Embroidered Animals by Chloe Giordano

Artist Tumblr

Chloe Giordano is a self-described “illustrator, avid reader, history lover and dreadful knitter” from Buckinghamshire, England. She may not be a great knitter, but her embroidery is more than up to par. Shown here are her tiny embroidered animals, done freehand. Giordano’s mixture of multiple colored threads adds detail and dimension

Oh god.  I love these so much I could die.

(via frytha)

Perversion for Profit is a 1965 propaganda film financed by Charles Keating and narrated by news reporter George Putnam. A vehement diatribe against pornography, the film argues that sexually explicit materials corrupt young viewers and readers, leading to acts of violence and “perverted” attitudes regarding sex—including inclination toward homosexuality. Although Perversion for Profit is quite serious in its suggestion that pornography could erode the integrity of American culture, its broad claims and dramatic presentation make the film somewhat comical

OMG! Sex is so terrifying!

Questions about “don’t tag your hate”

destinationtoast:

cosmoglaut:

destinationtoast:

I don’t understand some things about the “don’t tag your hate” philosophy.  I’d like to understand better.  To be up front about some of my motive for asking: I think I might disagree, but it might be that I only disagree with a strawman version of it — I’d like to give it a fair shake.  And I’m curious about information curation strategies, how social norms and knowledge indexing/retrieval interact, and various philosophies and approaches. 

Read More

Since I haven’t seen it being discussed, I am wondering if people are aware of how tagging works on tumblr. If you (general ‘you’ btw) tag your post with #CertainTag, you will always be able to find it on your blog by going to YourURL/tagged/CertainTag.

If you use that tag within first five tags, then tumblr.com/tagged/CertainTag will also show your post in a list of posts. This is the general tag search which people use for finding stuff from the blogs they don’t follow. Of course, this works for only the original posts that a blogger makes, reblogs are not included in tumblr tag search. In that sense, it does work like a community.

But if you place CertainTag sixth or later in your tag train, e.g. #first tag #second tag #third tag #fourth tag #fifth tag #CertainTag, then this will filter out your post from tumblr.com/tagged/CertainTag while still showing up in YourURL/tagged/CertainTag.

Which means, by tagging CertainTag within first five, by default you open your post for public discussion. If you do this, and someone calls you out for it for any number of reasons, the argument of “This is my blog, I will say whatever I want,” weakens. It is not just your blog, your post is in general tag search. As someone pointed out, if you don’t want to have that kind of attention, don’t tag it with CertainTag (within first five tags).

In this sense, destinationtoast's analogy of library cards works. It's just that, the way tumblr is built, it's so easy to crowd these cards with nonsense quickly. E.g. if dominant-pair!shippers started describing why they dislike a rarepair ship while tagging it within first five tags with the name of that rarepair ship, the tag is overwhelmed with negativity. And this when (hypothetically) every dislike post is a nuanced critique.

So sometimes I wonder if tags on tumblr have become, and should be treated, more like lanes on highways. Like, let the first five lanes be Squee Lanes, and for your own usage, use the later ones. If you do decide to bring your post (be it a discussion or outright hate) in the Squee Lanes, then don’t expect that by default that post will be welcome, better be prepared to get honked at too.

This is a great addition to the conversation — thank you for bringing this up!

It took me forever to realize that Tumblr only indexes the first 5 tags for search.  I think of this as an “advanced Tumblr feature” — probably only people who post and tag a lot and/or are interacting with knowledgable Tumblr users regularly will be aware of it.  But I don’t have any user survey data to support this belief (just general knowledge that most people on social networks are lurkers, and most people who aren’t lurking still don’t know about a bunch of the advanced features).  

I also suspect it might not actually be so much a feature as a limitation of what Tumblr can reasonably support, search-wise.  Meaning that they might at any time start indexing the first 10 tags, or all the tags, instead — and throw the whole “don’t tag hate in the first five tags” strategy into disarray.  But for now, it does work to keep controversial/personal indexing tags out of the first five, if you want to avoid discussion with folks who might disagree. 

Learning new things about tumblr and tagging.