it’s all culture

elizabethminkel:

When I was, oh, maybe 16, I went to Borders to seek out the CD box set of Andrea Chénier, an opera by Italian composer Umberto Giordano. [Side note: I believe my great-grandparents were Giordanos so I’ve just decided I’m related to this guy.] Borders was our local bookstore, funny to think of it now, the kind of “big box store becomes vibrant community space with no viable independent option” and it’s where I spent a good portion of the money I earned folding khakis at the GAP. It was sad to come back to my hometown and see the hulking shell of the two-story brick store on Broadway the past few years. Now, weirdly, it’s a kind of cheesy-looking marketing agency, and an independent bookstore has finally come to town, just across the street.

OK WAIT this wasn’t supposed to be about Borders. But it is sort of about Borders. You know how they had all those coupons? Buy one and we will shove nineteen free ones in your hands? You know how they had everything? It felt like they did. They’d order it for you from another store if they didn’t. I know, I should’ve gone to the library more often (I did almost exclusively before I had a job), but I kind of had this sense that every book or CD I purchased would be read multiple times or listened to on repeat.

This turned out to be largely true. My teenage years were a series of obsessive curiosities, one linking to the next. I’ve got such strong attachments, in my mind, to that Borders. Marching in there, on a mission. Tucked up in its corners. Trying on a million different skins, picking up a book that just might help me figure out which skin I’d eventually wear. The place where I spent my midnights decked out in house robes, waiting for Harry Potter with a giant crowd. Or years before, where I ran, after reading a borrowed copy of the Sorcerer’s Stone, to buy the Chamber of Secrets. There’s such a charged intimacy in that memory. It was November and it was already snowing and I devoured it. And the next one. And the next.

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Love this, because yes — shaming people for loving things is truly the stupidest thing ever, and really, for me, loving things is the way I think about them and think about how to live my life and be who I am. I honestly don’t think it matters what you love — what matters is that you do, and that you let whatever it is about that thing work in you through that feeling. I’ll be damned if I’m going to feel the least bit ashamed of loving something.

And… the whole thing about girls being shamed for what they love and how they love it… seriously, my blood boils. My teenage years were just the start of a lifetime full of obsessions with various things that caught me and arrested me and forced me to concentrate on them. I have always fallen in love with fictional characters and worlds. I have never been temperate in my preoccupation with the things I love, and it has not hurt me ONE BIT. In fact, those engagements are the spaces where I think and realise and process and learn. Every one of those preoccupations have been of immense and immeasurable value to me.

Anyway, this is a soapbox I could rock pretty hard. Love the shit you love, ladies, don’t let anyone tell you there’s a goddamned thing wrong with it.

professorfangirl:

unreconstructedfangirl:

allysongrono:

I just found this and fell through a black hole of fangirl, never to be found again. LATERZ

WUT. No.

I showed this to my boyfriend at the coffeeshop and he got so flustered he was literally speechless. A friend asked, “No offense, Warren, but aren’t you straight?” and bf answered, “NOBODY’S that straight!”

And then, I reblogged it again because I was still totally incredulous. I mean, who wouldn’t be the meat in this sandwich? ONLY A CRAZY PERSON WOULD SAY NO TO THIS.

professorfangirl:

unreconstructedfangirl:

allysongrono:

I just found this and fell through a black hole of fangirl, never to be found again. LATERZ

WUT. No.

I showed this to my boyfriend at the coffeeshop and he got so flustered he was literally speechless. A friend asked, “No offense, Warren, but aren’t you straight?” and bf answered, “NOBODY’S that straight!”

And then, I reblogged it again because I was still totally incredulous. I mean, who wouldn’t be the meat in this sandwich? ONLY A CRAZY PERSON WOULD SAY NO TO THIS.

Anonymous asked:

Do you ever think you'll stop drawing fanart? No offense it just seems like the kind of thing you're supposed to grow out of. I'm just curious what your plans/goals are since it isn't exactly an art form that people take seriously.

elizabethminkel:

corpsereviver2:

talesfromthemek:

linzeestyle:

euclase:

Ah, fanart. Also known as the art that girls make.

Sad, immature girls no one takes seriously. Girls who are taught that it’s shameful to be excited or passionate about anything, that it’s pathetic to gush about what attracts them, that it’s wrong to be a geek, that they should feel embarrassed about having a crush, that they’re not allowed to gaze or stare or wish or desire. Girls who need to grow out of it.

That’s the art you mean, right?

Because in my experience, when grown men make it, nobody calls it fanart. They just call it art. And everyone takes it very seriously.

It’s interesting though — the culture of shame surrounding adult women and fandom. Even within fandom it’s heavily internalized: unsurprisingly, mind, given that fandom is largely comprised by young girls and, unfortunately, our culture runs on ensuring young girls internalize *all* messages no matter how toxic. But here’s another way of thinking about it.

Sports is a fandom. It requires zealous attention to “seasons,” knowledge of details considered obscure to those not involved in that fandom, unbelievable amounts of merchandise, and even “fanfic” in the form of fantasy teams. But this is a masculine-coded fandom. And as such, it’s encouraged - built into our economy! Have you *seen* Dish network’s “ultimate fan” advertisements, which literally base selling of a product around the normalization of all consuming (male) obsession? Or the very existence of sports bars, built around the link between fans and community enjoyment and analysis. Sport fandom is so ingrained in our culture that major events are treated like holidays (my gym closes for the Super Bowl) — and can you imagine being laughed at for admitting you didn’t know the difference between Supernatural and The X Files the way you might if you admit you don’t know the rules of football vs baseball, or basketball?

"Fandom" is not childish but we live in a culture that commodified women’s time in such away that their hobbies have to be "frivolous," because "mature" women’s interests are supposed to be marriage, family, and overall care taking: things that allow others to continue their own special interests, while leaving women without a space of their own.

So think about what you’re actually saying when you call someone “too old” for fandom. Because you’re suggesting they are “too old” for a consuming hobby, and I challenge you to answer — what do you think they should be doing instead?

Yup.

Imagine the looks I’d get if I showed up at work:
-on the day of my show’s season premier put a flag and magnetic stickers on my car with a show logo or symbol
- wore a show T-shirt & left early so I could BBQ and drink beer before show time
- brought around a magazine with my characters on the cover & bragged about how they were the best
- announced after work drinks at a fan-bar where all my shows were on screens & even the wait staff wore fandom jerseys

I only get this at cons. Sports fans get it in RL.

I have SO MANY THOUGHTS about this. I’m planning to make it a topic of one of my columns. I’d even argue—and have seen argued elsewhere—that now ladies are doubly screwed, because male geekdom, once shunned, is weirdly trendy—but the female expressions are still roundly mocked. 

Let’s keep talking about it until someone gives us a reasonable answer to why all these things are cool with sports and not cool with other fandom (They won’t.)

Another thing that is really infuriating is the way fandoms with loads of men and women in them are accepting ways that straight men express fannishness, but merciless to the ways that women and queer men express it. On that note, have I got a story to tell you about my past fannish exploits. But, maybe not here or now. It’s a long one.

I’m well aware that five years ago – maybe even just two or three years ago – I wouldn’t have been asked to write a column about fan culture. I wouldn’t have pitched it, either. But the world has changed – is changing, and quickly. Many fans have spent years, decades, even, shielding themselves from mainstream scrutiny – but it’s impossible to deny that the scrutiny is here, butting up against things a lot of people have held cloistered for a long time (and, given the misunderstanding and mockery, with good reason). As technology advances, the shapes of our conversations change, as does the way we consume media – and even the way that media is created is shifting. We’re watching the world of entertainment and the way we engage with it reshape itself in real time. And it’s easier than ever to see the other people who love our thing, or the people who make our thing, or the people who want to monetise our love of the thing.

elizabethminkel, introducing her new regular column on fan culture for the NS, asks whether 2014 is indeed the “Year of the Fan”. (via newstatesman)

(MY FIRST COLUMN YOU GUYS!!!)

Yay! it was awesome! Congratulations! <3

(via elizabethminkel)

karin-woywod:

2011 11 04 - ’ Parade’s End ‘  Portraits by Iris Brosch
Open in new tab for 1000+ pixels’ versions&#160;!
Caption&#160;: Programme Name: Parades End - TX: n/a - Episode: n/a (No. 1) - Mammoth Screen - Photographer: Iris Brosch
Source 01
Source 02 &amp; 03

In character portraits are fascinating. That first one, with the one pleading eyebrow? Amazing.
Zoom Info
karin-woywod:

2011 11 04 - ’ Parade’s End ‘  Portraits by Iris Brosch
Open in new tab for 1000+ pixels’ versions&#160;!
Caption&#160;: Programme Name: Parades End - TX: n/a - Episode: n/a (No. 1) - Mammoth Screen - Photographer: Iris Brosch
Source 01
Source 02 &amp; 03

In character portraits are fascinating. That first one, with the one pleading eyebrow? Amazing.
Zoom Info
karin-woywod:

2011 11 04 - ’ Parade’s End ‘  Portraits by Iris Brosch
Open in new tab for 1000+ pixels’ versions&#160;!
Caption&#160;: Programme Name: Parades End - TX: n/a - Episode: n/a (No. 1) - Mammoth Screen - Photographer: Iris Brosch
Source 01
Source 02 &amp; 03

In character portraits are fascinating. That first one, with the one pleading eyebrow? Amazing.
Zoom Info

karin-woywod:

2011 11 04 - ’ Parade’s End ‘  Portraits by Iris Brosch

Open in new tab for 1000+ pixels’ versions !

Caption : Programme Name: Parades End - TX: n/a - Episode: n/a (No. 1) - Mammoth Screen - Photographer: Iris Brosch

Source 01

Source 02 & 03

In character portraits are fascinating. That first one, with the one pleading eyebrow? Amazing.

(via foxestacado)